The notion of how structure and growth stem from undirected processes drew me to test microbial colonies at RISD's Nature Lab. These species expand and grow with the potential ability to communicate and reproduce by the billions from a single a cell instigating a process of colonisation seemingly protecting and demarcating. When further magnified, you can see glimpses of a complex cosmos, both stirring and revivifying human imagination. Observing these morphologies of colony growth is an intentional inquiry to understand if such a thesis could link to human territories and divisions. As nature defines it, we are embodiment within embodiments, shuffling in time and space through inherit systems forming clusters that govern our own worlds. Social behaviours are cultivated and institutionalised to subject order in human society and such configuration has resulted in social groupings for survival, protection and valued differences. We have drawn visible and invisible boundaries in sociological spaces constricting our sense of individuality. But how do we navigate our current understanding if even on a micro scale divisions are potentially the inexorable archetype? The question of belonging seems pertinent no matter the scale and emphasises the need to constantly struggle to understand the myriad of social behaviours, stigmas and human persistence and preservation.

The notion of how structure and growth stem from undirected processes drew me to test microbial colonies at RISD's Nature Lab. These species expand and grow with the potential ability to communicate and reproduce by the billions from a single a cell instigating a process of colonisation seemingly protecting and demarcating. When further magnified, you can see glimpses of a complex cosmos, both stirring and revivifying human imagination. Observing these morphologies of colony growth is an intentional inquiry to understand if such a thesis could link to human territories and divisions. As nature defines it, we are embodiment within embodiments, shuffling in time and space through inherit systems forming clusters that govern our own worlds. Social behaviours are cultivated and institutionalised to subject order in human society and such configuration has resulted in social groupings for survival, protection and valued differences. We have drawn visible and invisible boundaries in sociological spaces constricting our sense of individuality. But how do we navigate our current understanding if even on a micro scale divisions are potentially the inexorable archetype? The question of belonging seems pertinent no matter the scale and emphasises the need to constantly struggle to understand the myriad of social behaviours, stigmas and human persistence and preservation.

 The notion of how structure and growth stem from undirected processes drew me to test microbial colonies at RISD's Nature Lab. These species expand and grow with the potential ability to communicate and reproduce by the billions from a single a cell instigating a process of colonisation seemingly protecting and demarcating. When further magnified, you can see glimpses of a complex cosmos, both stirring and revivifying human imagination. Observing these morphologies of colony growth is an intentional inquiry to understand if such a thesis could link to human territories and divisions. As nature defines it, we are embodiment within embodiments, shuffling in time and space through inherit systems forming clusters that govern our own worlds. Social behaviours are cultivated and institutionalised to subject order in human society and such configuration has resulted in social groupings for survival, protection and valued differences. We have drawn visible and invisible boundaries in sociological spaces constricting our sense of individuality. But how do we navigate our current understanding if even on a micro scale divisions are potentially the inexorable archetype? The question of belonging seems pertinent no matter the scale and emphasises the need to constantly struggle to understand the myriad of social behaviours, stigmas and human persistence and preservation.

The notion of how structure and growth stem from undirected processes drew me to test microbial colonies at RISD's Nature Lab. These species expand and grow with the potential ability to communicate and reproduce by the billions from a single a cell instigating a process of colonisation seemingly protecting and demarcating. When further magnified, you can see glimpses of a complex cosmos, both stirring and revivifying human imagination. Observing these morphologies of colony growth is an intentional inquiry to understand if such a thesis could link to human territories and divisions. As nature defines it, we are embodiment within embodiments, shuffling in time and space through inherit systems forming clusters that govern our own worlds. Social behaviours are cultivated and institutionalised to subject order in human society and such configuration has resulted in social groupings for survival, protection and valued differences. We have drawn visible and invisible boundaries in sociological spaces constricting our sense of individuality. But how do we navigate our current understanding if even on a micro scale divisions are potentially the inexorable archetype? The question of belonging seems pertinent no matter the scale and emphasises the need to constantly struggle to understand the myriad of social behaviours, stigmas and human persistence and preservation.

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